Weekend Review (2/3) (Women)


Camel City Invitational

800

It’s tough to start this weekend’s wrap-up anywhere other than JDL Fast Track and the incredible race over four laps. Ajee’ Wilson led a massive race to set the flat-track world record in 1:59.26. That race pulled Martha Bissah of Norfolk State to the NCAA #1 qualifying spot in 2:03.99 (converts to 2:02.58).


Bissah has shown incredible strength this season after qualifying for the NCAA final last June. Heading into 2019, doubt surrounded Bissah’s role in the NCAA title race; however, the Norfolk State star has shown that June’s race was not a fluke, but a breakout.


Abike Egbeniyi struggled in this race with a time of 2:06.59 for Middle Tennessee State. Egbeniyi still slots in at NCAA #3 from earlier in the season, but this race will not inspire any confidence moving forward.


Mile

Welcome back Virginia Tech! The Hokies had appeared in some 1000 meter races earlier in the season and had not given a true go at any NCAA qualifying events until now. Rachel Pocratsky and Sarah Edwards finished in identical 4:36.49's to tie for the NCAA #5 spot (converted 4:33.78).


While Pocratsky’s result was expected, Edwards tying her teammate is huge for a potential Virginia Tech DMR. Last year, Edwards anchored the team at NCAA's while Pocratsky opted to skip the relay. Laurie Barton has still yet to appear for Virginia Tech, so the Hokies may need both of them on relay duty in 2019. Earning mile qualifying times this weekend eases the pressure though and opens up more possibilities for this duo.


Kim Hallowes of Duke and Nevada Moreno closed out the invitational section with times of 4:48 and 4:52. Meanwhile, Duke’s Liz Lansing and Leigha Torino ran 4:51 in the open sections.


3000

While the collegiate athletes could not get the win in this event either, it did result in an NCAA lead. Elly Henes finished 5th overall and as the top collegiate runner, established the new NCAA #1 with her flat-track timeof 9:06.36. This converts to 9:01.72 and puts Henes in the NCAA qualifying conversation in all three distance events. Only Karisa Nelson of Samford can claim an equally impressive trio of results so far this season.


Hannah Steelman of Wofford was close behind Henes in 9:03.22 which converts to an NCAA #2 placing. Steelman has run career bests in the 800, mile, 3k, and 5k this indoor season. Who knows how much more time Steelman can knock off or which race she might target. Regardless, the Wofford star could play spoiler with another improvement in the next few weeks.


Morgan Ilse of North Carolina also flew up the NCAA list to #6 with her flat-track 9:13 (converted 9:08.54). Ilse, like Steelman, is on the outside looking in for NCAA's, but could certainly play spoiler with another breakout race. Dominique Clairmonte of North Carolina State was the final runner under 9:20 with her 9:19.41 (converted NCAA #12 9:14.66).


Clairmonte and teammate Henes have represented the Wolfpack extremely well in 2019 and could combine for a DMR challenge. The rest of the 3k invitational field had very respectable results too, as did the leaders of the open race.


BU Bruce Lehane Scarlett and While Invitational

800

UConn’s Susan Aneno raced to the top collegiate finisher status in 2:04.67. Although it's not an improvement, it is within a second of her season best and shows that Aneno is in good form.


Monmouth’s Allie Wilson did make an improvement though, as she moves up the list with her 2:05.14. Wilson’s time is good for NCAA #6 and displays her own consistency after two weekends of 2:06's. Wilson is probably outside of NCAA qualification with this result, but has set herself up well for more improvements and continues to carry the 800 meter flag for Monmouth with Dylan Capwell now graduated on the men's side.


Ashley Lewis of George Mason clocked in with a 2:06.71 as the last NCAA athlete under 2:10. This was her first 800 of the season after racing off distances in preparation for the four-lapper.


Mile

The top D1 result from this race was UConn’s Mia Nahom in 4:44.83. Hannah Reinhardt and Clare Severe of Albany and Lehigh, respectively finished close behind in 4:45. DII's Simon Fraser took the top overall NCAA mark of the meet with Addy Townsend running 4:44.81.


3000

UAB’s Emily Drouin earns another mention in the weekend reviews as she is the top college finisher in 9:35.28.


Power Five Invitational

800

Aurora Rynda of Michigan ran a very quick 2:06.80 to beat out all but Nike athlete Shannon Osika. Rynda led teammate Hannah Meier to a 2:08.67 with Indiana’s Mallory Mulzer close behind in 2:08.90. Michigan’s Lauren Biggs and Alice Hill also broke 2:10 to make it four Michigan Wolverines under 2:10.


Mile

Bethany Hasz of Minnesota took the first win for the Hasz twins as she broke away from the field to run 4:42.79. Katherine Receveur of Indiana earned a 2nd place finish in 4:47.96 after a series of disappointing DNF's earlier this season.


Anne Forsyth of Michigan is also building on an impressive freshman resume after running 4:48. Bailey Hertenstein of Indiana also ran 4:48.


Another noteworthy time is a 4:50 result from Sharon Lokedi of Kansas. Lokedi is not expected to make an impact in the mile, but that result is slightly concerning for her ability to compete in a championship 5k. Lokedi ran 15:15 in December, but will need to have more speed than what she showed this past weekend to compete at Nationals.


3000

The second Hasz victory came from Megan in the 3k as she raced to a 9:31.63. She outraced Kathryn House of Michigan who ran an impressive 9:35.51 to bolster the Wolverine’s depth. Lynsie Gram of Michigan State and Patty O’Brien of Minnesota rounded out the top four in 9:36 and 9:39, respectively.


DMR

Vanderbilt edged Pittsburgh, Michigan, and Georgia Tech as all four teams were within four seconds of each other. Kendall Derry anchored Vanderbilt as they took the win in 11:37.34.


Colorado Invitational

800

Skylyn Webb of UC-Colorado Springs led the field to set the DII NCAA record at altitude. Her raw time of 2:04.68 was good enough to set the record by a full second. That’s before the altitude conversion which would have dropped the time to 2:03.87. The DI ranks were well represented as well by Cammy Sargent of Northern Colorado with a 2:07.32 which converts to 2:06.50 for NCAA purposes. Colorado’s Mann sisters Elissa and Karina both ran 2:09.


Mile

Tabor Scholl of Colorado broke into the mile conversation with a 4:41.85. That time converts all the way down to an NCAA #9 4:34.98 and likely cements Scholl’s spot in the mile at NCAA's. This is a good sign for a Colorado's DMR and the rest of the Buffalos’ chances moving forward. Scholl led Sarah Feeny of Utah and Roisin Flanagan of Adams State to 4:46's. Those times convert to approximately 4:39.


3000

Makena Morley of Colorado stepped back onto the track as well this weekend with a 9:20 to convert to 9:04.89 for NCAA #3. Morley qualified in both the 3k and 5k in 2018 and will certainly want to return to those races after and having a resurgence during cross country. Sage Hurta ran 9:27, but was competing unattached.


Notre Dame Meyo Invitational

800

Kelly Hart of Notre Dame set the top DI time in 2:07.00 as Rachael Walters of Grand Valley State narrowly edged her to move up the DII list. Hattie Plumb of Illinois State managed 5th overall with 2:09.14 with Janelle Noe of Toledo was right behind in 2:09.52. Lyndsie Schinkel of Northern Iowa and Erin Sullivan of Notre Dame also managed to break 2:10.


Hart bolsters a strong Notre Dame lineup that may opt for a quick DMR, especially with Alex Wilson being on their home track.


Mile

Annie Fuller and Carlyn Arteaga of Michigan State led the collegiate ranks in 4:39.70 and 4:42.69, respectively. Michigan State was relatively overshadowed by intrastate rivals Michigan and regional individual stars Alicia Monson and Aubrey Roberts. The Spartans are trying to take that attention back and deserve more recognition based on these results. They defeated Aubrey Roberts in this race as the Northwestern Wildcat earned 5th in 4:43.81 and Sydney Meyers of Eastern Michigan in 4:43.88.


Indiana State’s S. Brooke Moore jumped into 7th and Rachel DaDamio represented the home team in 8th, both in 4:44.


3000

Erin McDonald of Michigan State took home the victory for the Spartans in 9:19.10 ahead of Jacqueline Gaughan and Karrigan Smith. Gaughan of Notre Dame ran 9:22 while Smith of Michigan State ran 9:25.


Loyola (Ill.)’s Lindsey Brewis also ran 9:25.62 while Rachel King of South Dakota State ran 9:29.79.


DMR

Illinois State’s team of Hickey-White-Plumb-Beattie earned a time of 11:39 to take the victory.


Villanova Invitational

800

McKenna Keegan of Villanova earned the top slot at 2:07.26. She will be an important part of the Wildcats’ DMR later this season.


Mile

Rachel McArthur rebounded after a rough race last week to run 4:37.79. She will team up with Nicole Hutchinson as a formidable duo in the mile.


New Mexico Classic

Mile

Adva Cohen of New Mexico had a wonderful double in 4:45.98 after running a 2:10 for 800 meters. Her mile converts to 4:39.75.


Close behind was Lilian Koech of UTEP who ran 4:46.21 which converts to 4:39.97. Hannah Nuttall of New Mexico and Carolyne Chepkosgei of UTEP ran converted 4:41's.


Texas Tech Open

800

Kansas’ Marleena Eubanks beat teammate Nicole Montgomery, 2:07.94 to 2:08.79. They will earn a small altitude conversion to help them up the qualifying lists.


Doc Hale VT Elite

800

While her teammates were crushing times at Camel City, Shannon Quinn earned the home victory in 2:08.01. That result offers the Hokies an extra 800 leg for their DMR if some individuals opt to go for individual events only at NCAA's.


Rod McCravy Memorial

800

Annie Ubbing and Aziza Ayoub continue to improve for Ohio State as they ran 2:08.61 and 2:08.82 for the top two spots.


Mile

Julia Rizk of Ohio State ran away from the field to go 4:43.78 and followed that up with a 2:11 800 double. Rizk and the entire Ohio State team is starting to impress and beginning to show that they can make a difference at BIG 10's (and maybe NCAA's if they pull together a great race).